Current Films

 This Season’s Upcoming Films

The new season is coming – with our first film on 13th October


All films are shown in the Gates Hall (formerly the Fuller McLellan Hall) at the Lymington Centre. Doors open 30mins before show and refreshments are available.

LFS Membership costs £25 (entry to all 8 films). LFS members must also be members of the Lymington Centre (Enquiries on 01590 672337)

Alternatively tickets are available for each film at £7.00 on the door, £6.00 for Lymington Centre members.


Sunday 13th October 2019    8pm

Faces Places (2017; French)

Dir: Agnès Varda, 1hr 34mins, PG.

2019-189 year old Agnes Varda (1928-2019), one of the leading lights of France’s honoured New Wave cinema era, and street artist J.R. team up together in search of friends old and new across France, creating remarkable moving portraits of the people they meet en route. Veering between moments of collective joy and great personal poignancy, a road movie with a difference!


Sunday 10th November 2019    7.30pm

Capernaum (2018; Arabic)

Dir: Nadine Labaki, 2hrs 6mins, 15

2019-2Winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival (2018), Capernaum tells the story of a gutsy streetwise Lebanese boy, who fleeshis negligent parents, and survives through his wits on the streets. The brutally honest film about Dickensian living conditions in Beirut slums was made with a cast of non-professionals playing characters whose lives closely parallel their own, with a simply excellent performance from its juvenile lead. (Rotten Tomatoes; BFI)


Sunday 8th December 2019       7.30pm

Woman at War (2018; Icelandic)

Dir: Benedikt Erlingsson, Ihr 41mins, 12A

2019-3An off-the-wall comedy and contemporary environmental fable about a woman fighting to save the planet and adopt a child at the same time. A winning mix of absurdist comedy and tense thriller, Woman at War is easy to enjoy in the moment, yet its impact lingers long after the closing credits roll. (Guardian; Rotten Tomatoes; Roger Ebert; BFI)

 


Sunday 12th January 2020         7:30pm

Shoplifters (2018; Japanese)

Dir: Hirokazu Koreeda, 2hrs 1min, 15

2019-4This Palme d’Or-winning drama {2018) follows a marginalised band of thieves living in the poverty-stricken fringes of Japan and who have made common cause with each other. An intricate and nuanced family drama in the classical Japanese style which steals up on our feelings, this is a rich, satisfying and deeply intelligent film. (Guardian; BFI)


Sunday 9th February 2020         7:30pm

Transit (2018; German)

Dir: Christian Petzold, 1hrs 41mins, 12A

2019-5A man attempting to escape occupied France falls in love with the wife of a dead author whose identity he has assumed. Adapted from Anna Seghers’ 1942 novel of the same name, this film is subtly disorientating, with the drama transplanted to present-day Marseilles to combine the continent’s moral failings, past and present.(IMDB; IndieWire)


Sunday 8th March 2020               7:30pm

Pain and Glory (2019; Spanish)

Dir: Pedro Almodóvar, 1hr 53mins, 15

2019-6A film director reflects on the choices he’s made in life as past and present come crashing down around him. Almodóvar is in an introspective mood in this his 21st feature film, a sensuous and deeply personal gem. (IMDB; Guardian; BFI)

 


 Sunday 19th April 2020               8.00pm

Nae Pasaran (2018; English/Spanish)

Dir : Felipe Bustos Sierra 1hr 36mins, 12A

2019-7In a Scottish town in 1974, factory workers refuse to carry out repairs on warplane engines in an act of solidarity against the violent military coup in Chile. 40 years after their defiant stand in protest against Pinochet’s Air Force, Scottish pensioners discover the dramatic consequences of their solidarity in this heartfelt and poignant documentary. (IMDB; Guardian)

NB: April’s film is taking place on 3rd Sunday of the month to avoid Easter, and will be preceded by Annual General Meeting at 6.45 PM (Members only)


Sunday 10th May 2020                8.00pm

I Got Life (2017; French)

Dir: Blandine Lenoir 1hr 29mins, 15

2019-8-I got LifeBlandine Lenoir’s lovely, intricate film tackles a subject that rarely gets addressed in the arts, with a comical lilt. The ‘everyday heroine’ of this film defies convention to show the realities of age discrimination, menopause – and happiness – post-50. A life-affirming, upbeat French comedy to round off the season! (Timeout; Irish Times; BFI)


 

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